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Helping you to manage IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome, commonly known as IBS, is no one’s favourite conversation topic despite the fact that it is a very common and manageable condition that many people will experience throughout their lives.

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Irritable bowel syndrome, commonly known as IBS, is no one’s favourite conversation topic despite the fact that it is a very common and manageable condition that many people will experience throughout their lives.

Irritable bowel syndrome, commonly known as IBS, is no one’s favourite conversation topic despite the fact that it is a very common and manageable condition that many people will experience throughout their lives.  This may be why very few people know how to manage the symptoms, because there simply isn’t enough conversation on the topic. This condition is all about the gut and as the pillar of our award-winning Health Regime rests on improving gut health, we wanted to share some information on exactly what IBS is, and how to manage it.

What is IBS?

IBS is a collection of symptoms in the intestinal area that, when occurring in the same individual, constitute a condition. The symptoms include cramping, bloating, constipation, gas and diarrhoea and to constitute IBS the symptoms must be present for at least three days a month over three months. IBS is a very individual specific condition, where some may experience very mild symptoms rarely and others may find more severe symptoms having a large impact on their everyday lives. Due to this, a common secondary symptom is a reduced mood, as the painful symptoms of IBS can restrict ability to conduct everyday tasks with ease.

IBS can also flare up at certain times depending on diet and hormones, so the symptoms may not always be present.

Are women more susceptible?

It is considerably more common for women to experience symptoms of IBS than it is for men. This may be due to women’s hormone fluctuation throughout their menstrual cycle causing an imbalance and changes in the way the gut functions as well as potentially lowering regular pain threshold, so are more likely to notice symptoms.

It may seem that menstrual cycle hormones have no connection to the intestine, but the reproductive system, like any part of the body is not independent but rather a part of a much larger and more complex machine. All parts of the human body work together to maintain function, so when any area falls out of sync or experiences hormonal changes, everything will be affected. This is why the entire body feels affected during different times of the menstrual cycle- and why IBS symptoms may be particularly severe during your period.

Symptoms can also be more sever during pregnancy but begin to reduce after the menopause as hormone levels settle.

How to manage IBS

The two most simple and effective methods of managing IBS is adjusting diet and trying to reduce stress in any way possible. Our ethos here at Grayshott Health Spa is that good health begins at the gut- as this is where we get all the vitamins and nutrients we need to function at our best and filter out anything we don’t need. Our in-house experts have devised the best recipes and routines to restore the balance of the good micro bacteria in your gut lining so that the rest of your body can function to its full potential.

Our 7-day Health Regime will see you spend a whole week relaxing and taking in our beautiful grounds in Surrey, with a carefully designed routine to boost your system and have you leaving us feeling rejuvenated. The heart of The Health Regime, though, is our carefully-created menu of healthy and delicious food designed to let your gut rest and recuperate with lean and fermented foods. Letting your gut rest with foods chosen to reduce stress on the immune system will hugely reduce the symptoms of IBS and teach you the best ways to continue to manage it in your everyday life so you can get back to doing everything you love to do.


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